Richmond VA > Grants > Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program

Last Updated: 2013-10-07

Program Narrative

The city of Richmond's estimated population is approximately 200,000. It is generally accepted that the total population for Richmond and immediate jurisdictions is nearly 800,000. The population is very diverse and includes as many as 50,000 undocumented Hispanics. Richmond, Virginia's capitol city has major highway systems that flow directly through the city limits. Interstate 95, the main north-south artery of the east coast and Interstate 64, a primary east-west thoroughfare, are essential links to business and commerce, tourist attractions and various attractions within the city and surrounding jurisdictions. The combination of these factors, as well as others, contributes to the daily public safety challenges facing Richmond.

The city of Richmond, with the Richmond Police Department (RPD) as lead agency, has developed a comprehensive strategy to address public safety issues. The RPD continues to work with various federal partners including DEA, FBI, ATF and USAO on various initiatives. This focused approach to reduce violence has been successful with the assistance of local and state partners as well (Commonwealth Attorney’s Office and Virginia Office of Attorney General). Under the leadership of Chief Ray J. Tarasovic, the RPD philosophy of policing involves a focused law enforcement approach, community and law enforcement partnerships, and systemic prevention programs.

RPD Mission

We make Richmond a safer city through community policing and engagement.

RPD Vision

The city of Richmond is a thriving community offering safe neighborhoods and an enhanced quality of life through responsive, communication and public trust.

Organizational Capacity

RPD is led by Chief Ray J. Tarasovic. The following report directly to the Chief of Police::

  • Deputy Chief of Administration
  • Deputy Chief of Operations
  • Deputy Chief of Support Services
  • Chief of Staff
  • Office of Professional Responsibility
  • Disciplinary Review
  • Internal Affairs
  • General Counsel
  • Executive Protection Unit

The Administrative Division includes the following units: Training, Financial Management, Information Technology, Department of Emergency Communications and Human Resources. Subunits include Property and Evidence, Payroll, Recruit Academy, Officer Training, and Warrants and Information.

The Operations Division consists of approximately 425 officers assigned to this division. The officers are responsible for patrolling and providing first-class service to the citizens of Richmond. The four precincts are broken out into Area 1 and Area 2 and each precinct consists of 3 sectors each.

The Support Services Division conducts major case investigations against criminal organizations involving narcotics trafficking, prostitution, illegal gambling, sales and distribution of illegal liquors and pornography. Included in the Support Services Division are Narcotics, Asset Forfeiture, Gang, Vice and Technical Assistance units. In addition to eliminating criminal activities in the City of Richmond, this division also encompasses The Community, Youth and Intervention Services Unit. This unit is designed to improve the quality of life in neighborhoods, along with placing a greater emphasis on youth and seniors.

In total, the RPD consists of 753 sworn personnel and 150 civilian staff.

While the city of Richmond will ultimately provide oversight of the program, the Richmond Police Department will be the lead agency. Coordination of all programs will be handled by the department’s Grants Manager who is responsible for ensuring the programmatic and fiscal compliance of all grant activities. The RPD Grants Manager will be responsible for all financial reports as well as any programmatic reports required by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. Each of the project updates will be reported through the designated Department of Justice reporting tools including the Grants Management System and Performance Measurement Tools databases in accordance with DOJ guidelines. The Grants Manager has received training on each of the tools.

It should also be noted that the RPD is an active participant on the Richmond Community Criminal Justice Board (CCJB) and that the Grants Manager is assigned to the Finance and Quality Assurance Committee.

The Finance Quality and Assurance Committee is comprised of stakeholders from Richmond’s Criminal Justice, Finance, Planning and Budget community. The purpose of the Finance and Quality Assurance Committee is to promote full financial accountability; compliance with relevant laws and regulations; and efficient and effective operation of grant funded programs. The Committee shall: Review Board priorities to assess opportunities that may come forward through grant solicitations, foundations, or community partnerships; establish a standardized review and approval process for submitting federal, state, and local funding applications through city administration that serves the criminal justice service population; and review and approve specific proposals that have been developed after having received initial approval.

Diagram 1: The city is divided into two areas consisting of four precincts and 12 sectors.

Police Sector Map

The request for funding will be aligned within each of the three areas – Administration, Operations and Support Services – and will include the following project identifiers:

  1. Community Policing
  2. Violence – Violent Crime
  3. Youth Engagement
  4. Computer Software/Hardware
  5. Equipment – Video/Audio Recording

Administration

Records and Technology Division – Desktop Computers Replacement

The Records and Technology Division manages all of the major technical hardware and software services and systems of the department. In order to capture significant qualitative and quantitative data, it is important to equip sworn and non-sworn personnel with the appropriate tools for outcome measurement and data analysis. It is imperative that the RPD's computer hardware and software are comparable to other jurisdictions.

The RPD was on an inventory refresh schedule (every five years) but due to the economy and operational budget restraints, the goal of updating the department’s desktop computers has been slow.

The Records and Technology Division would like to update 68 desktop computers. The updated computers will eliminate the need to purchase hard drives, motherboards and the power supply to maintain this equipment. Often times, refurbished materials and parts are purchased but require a replacement within six months after installation. The older technology requires constant service and repair.

The new desktop computers will assist the Records and Technology Division in implementing Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) which monitors personal computer usage (memory and hard drive space), install/remove software and control personal computers from a remote location. The Records and Technology Division has determined which computers will be replaced and has developed an installation plan.

Operations

Overtime Initiatives – Fugitive and Firearms Initiative (FFI)

The RPD will also utilize overtime to support the Fugitive and Firearms Initiative (FFI), Summer Suppression, Fall and Winter Initiatives and special initiatives within the City. FFI is a joint firearm interdiction partnership between uniform Richmond Police Department and Virginia State Police staff supported by the A.T.F. The initiative targets those individuals that choose to use a firearm in an illegal manner. The FFI generally has been implemented for an operation for 100 days from Memorial Day thru Labor Day. The department is strongly considering some changes to this approach and will explore the possibility to run the targeted enforcement project throughout the year.

FFI uses predictive analysis to determine target locations that had a high propensity for random gunfire and violent crimes involving firearms during the spring months. Target locations are fluid based upon analysis, weather and operational success in certain areas. In addition to geographic locations, analytical research and social analysis assist in determining individuals with a high potential for firearm violence.

FFI has proven to be an important proactive strategy to address violence and gun crime within the City. The initiative will continue to assist law enforcement partners in increasing public safety.

In addition to FFI, the RPD proactively seeks to quell any rise in crime during the summer months by deploying officers at area parks that are traditionally extremely busy during that time. Past efforts to police the areas with bike and foot patrols have proved beneficial. Within the City, Belle’s Island, Brown’s Island and Shockoe Bottom continue to be problematic, particularly during the weekends. Added overtime patrol and visibility tends to minimize the criminal activity. It is expected that a 3% reduction in crime will be realized.

RPD will also employ special initiatives directly related to bike and foot patrol in targeted neighborhoods. During various times of the year, certain areas of the city experience a crime spike such as car theft or burglaries, for an example. To address this type of crime, bicycle and foot patrol has proved to be an effective way of addressing the issue and also meeting the needs of the citizens. Various areas have requested more bicycle patrol and it provides visibility to the specified areas, but also allows better patrols in alleys and areas not easily accessible. The concept is to saturate an area that experiences these spikes of criminal activity with two to four bicycle officers patrolling an area a few times a week for a 4 hour time frame. The purpose would be to prevent any further crimes and arrest any individual(s) that may be committing these offenses.

Proper equipment is essential to the success of the strategic initiatives. The utilization of bicycles and the appropriate protective gear enables offers to safely protect themselves from the risks they may encounter while patrolling.

Support Services - Financial and Technology Crimes Team and Technical Assistance Unit

Cellebrite Training

Members of the Richmond Police Department Financial and Technology Crimes Team and Technical Assistance Unit are tasked to assist many divisions within the Richmond Police Department with the downloading of information from cell phones. These cell phones are integral to the investigation of narcotics, robberies, homicides, and other crimes. In 2012, over 200 cell phones were turned over for evidence downloads to both FTCT and TAU. On average, each phone download takes approximately two to three hours. With updated equipment and training, the amount of time needed to download each phone would be significantly reduced which would aid in providing important information for reports, court cases and etc.

The Richmond Police Department currently possesses a Cellebrite cell phone downloading device that is several years old. The updates for this unit are scheduled to be discontinued within the next year. Technology is changing at such a rapid rate that this devise is only useful in approximately 50% of the phones that are currently being seized. As the technology advances, this device will not be as effective as the newer Cellebrite unit.

The need for training in this area is also necessary as technology is advancing at a staggering rate and cell phones are becoming more like mini-computers. The Richmond Police Department needs to update our current technology to deal with these changes. Cell phones available today have the ability to retain call logs, contact lists, text messages, pictures, videos, website information, as well as GPS locations where some applications and websites were accessed. This information is vital to investigations.

Project Description

The challenges, i.e. two to three hours to download one cell phone, facing the Richmond Police Department’s Cell phone forensics operation stem primarily from the lack of resources, the ever-increasing caseload, and the increasing complexity of technology involved in these cases. This issue can be addressed with grant funding. First and foremost the equipment and software will allow investigators to gain valuable information by downloading evidence from cellular phones. This equipment is crucial to many investigations. Below are several systems available to Law Enforcement to aid in this endeavor:

  • Cellebrite UFED analyzer
  • Lantern software
  • XRY analyzer
  • SecureView

These systems are costly due to the technology involved in collecting the information from current cellular devices. These systems also require yearly update fees to keep the systems current with changing technology. In the past, HIDTA has donated the Cellebrite systems abovementioned.

Having the proper equipment, unfortunately, is only one small portion of the challenge. We must also possess the requisite knowledge necessary to effectively investigate these types of cases. Unlike in standard law enforcement investigations, the techniques used in the investigation of cases involving cellular phones, the technological aspects change almost as fast as the technology changes. Understanding, and dealing with smartphones, pre-paid phones, and the applications which can be downloaded to these phones requires constant training. This need for continued training also holds true for the laws related to these technologies as they continually adapt to keep pace with the technological changes. For this reason, funding is necessary for the continued education of the assigned investigators. There are several private companies that offer additional training as laws and the technology involved in these phones advance.

The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center offers a one week class (Mobile Device Investigation Program) that provides training in understanding cell phone technologies. This class provides the student with standard tools and software most commonly used in cellular acquisitions and training to facilitate there use and facilitate there use in a mock investigative scenario. The training is held at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, GA.

The equipment provided by this class is valued at over $10,000.00 and is included in the cost of the course. This course will provide some of the necessary equipment needed for these investigations and will also cover the required training to utilize the equipment. This course is also the most cost effective way to gain the equipment and training needed to effectively investigate crimes involving cellular devices.

The Richmond Police Athletic League – Sports and Summer Camp Scholarships

The Richmond Police Athletic League (PAL) is a 501©3 non-profit organization staffed by Richmond Police Officers. The goal of PAL is to build relationships between police officers and the inner youth within the City of Richmond community, by using athletics as one of the vehicles. Sports activities often times challenge children to excel physically, mentally, and teach valuable skills such as leadership, hard work and perseverance. This can translate beyond the playing field to all aspects of life. Participating in sports more times than not has a positive effect on reducing the involvement and exposure youths may have to violence and unethical activity. This in turn benefits the community as a whole.

Funding is being requested to support the following: Football League, Lacrosse League, and 10 Scholarship Positions for our PAL Summer Camp.

Flag Football

Our goal through the flag football league is to field teams through each Middle School in the City of Richmond and to have a partnership where the kids are coached by police officers and staff from the schools. The league scheduled for eight weeks which includes games and practices. The interaction and time spent together through this sport activity will help facilitate relationships between the kids and the police officers. The league is sanctioned by NFL Flag and the kids receive licensed NFL jerseys through the league.

City Lacrosse Team

The PAL Indoor Lacrosse league is a six-week program in the winter where we are seeking to enter a team comprised of inner city youth. Through practice, mentoring, and constant encouragement we intend to build relationships and expose the youth to a sport that they otherwise would not have received exposure.

PAL Summer Camp Scholarships

The PAL summer camp is an eight-week program that exposes inner city youth, ages 9 to 13, to an invaluable experience. The kids participate in activities such as swimming, golfing, basketball, tennis, and flag football. Additionally, the campers visit local museums, participate in cultural activities and frequent Kings Dominion which is enjoyed by all kids. PAL’s summer camp is unique because the summer camp staff is Richmond Police Officers that normally work in Richmond Public Schools as School Resource Officers. They work with the groups individually which promote mentoring and a shared trust with the kids that last a lifetime.

Community Outreach & Partnerships

Adult Drug Court – Training and General Office Supplies

Richmond Adult Drug Treatment Court (RADTC) is a voluntary, Court-supervised substance abuse treatment program for nonviolent felony offenders. The program includes regular appearances before a Circuit Court Judge, drug testing, individual and group counseling, and 12-step meetings. Utilizing a team approach, on-site clinicians provide assessment and treatment, and probation officers provide supervision and ancillary services. During the 18-month program, participants seek to: obtain a drug free-lifestyle; maintain a law-abiding lifestyle; enhance employment skills; be involved in the recovery community; identify relapse warning signs and a plan for prevention; and identify specific needs and develop a treatment plan designed for recovery.

The typical participant in the Richmond Adult Drug Treatment Court (RADTC) has been addicted to crack cocaine for more than twenty years, with nine, non-violent drug-related convictions, is approximately 35 years old, Afro-American, lives in poverty, and often has co-occurring mental or physical conditions. When released from jail, the typical participant has little if any economic support, no job, and no supportive housing. He or she is released into a city that in 2007 saw over 1,900 drug arrests, an average of nearly one arrest for every 100 residents (See Footnote 1); a city with neighborhoods beset by decades of substance abuse; a city that, being bisected by Interstate 95, has continual ample illegal drug supply provided by the East Coast's most notorious trafficking route. As a long-term heavy drug user, the typical RADTC participant has family and friends who have current drug addictions(See Footnote 2).

The more frequent and severe someone uses, the more difficult it is to quit; the greater likelihood of relapse, and, in turn, the greater likelihood the abuser will have additional contact with the criminal justice system. Despite having limited or nonexistent employment histories, limited education, and being economically dependent on others, the voluntary nature of the program indicates that participants are highly motivated to make personal change.

The purpose of the proposed project is to provide intensive court monitoring and substance abuse treatment services to non-violent substance abusing offenders who bring a host of problems with them to the drug treatment program. The Richmond Adult Drug Court needs funding for staff training and general office supplies.

Footnote 1: Richmond Police Department data; arrest per citizen statistic is based on U.S. Census 2006 American Community Survey, showing total Richmond population as 192,033.

Footnote 2: Cohen, Allan J et al., "Response: No More '28 Days and You're Cured'", Addiction Science and Clinical Practice, NIDA, December 2007.

Commonwealth Attorney Office

A continued partnership with the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office is essential. The CA’s Office will provide training for attorney’s working closely with RPD’s Sector Lieutenants and Support Services Division. The important partnership has proven to be successful and necessary as the RPD continues to focus on the areas of prevention, intervention (Adult Drug Court), enforcement and prosecution (CA’s Office).

Justice Assistance Grant Budget Detail Worksheet

A. Personnel

Item Detailed Computation Amount
Suppression Teams 2450 hours x $32 $78,400.00
Overtime (FFI) 625 hours x $32 $20,000.00
Officers Overtime (Flag Football) 6 officers x 4 hrs. x 8 weeks x $52.00 per hour $9,984.00
Sub Total $108,384.00

B. Fringe Benefits

Item Detailed Computation Amount
N/A N/A N/A
Sub Total 0.00

C. Supplies

Item Detailed Computation Amount
Jerzeys & Belts (Flag Football) 80 players x $25.00 $2,000.00
Sub Total $2,000.00

D. Travel

Item Detailed Computation Amount
N/A N/A N/A
Sub Total 0.00

E. Equipment

Item Detailed Computation Amount
Equipment (Lacrosse) 10 players x $200.00 per player $2,000.00
Desktop Computers 34 desktop computers $26,983.00
Sub Total $29,000.00

F. Contractual

Item Detailed Computation Amount
Richmond Adult Drug Treatment Court 1 x $25,000.00 $25,000.00
Commonwealth Attorney's Office 1 x $10,000.00 $10,000.00
Field Costs (Flag Football) 8 weeks x 3 hrs. per week x $100.00 $2,400.00
2 Referees 2 Refs x 3 hrs. x 8 weeks x $25.00 per hour $1,200.00
Sub Total $38,600.00

G. Other

Item Detailed Computation Amount
League Fee (Lacrosse) 10 players x $150.00 per player $1,500.00
Richmond Police Athletic League (Summer Camp Scholarships/Registration Fee) 10 campers x $700.00 $7,000.00
Cellebrite Training (Mobile Device Investigation Program) 2 attendees x $5,750 per attendee $11,500.00
Sub Total $20,000.00

Budget Summary

Category Amount
A. Personnel $108,384.00
B. Fringe Benefits $0.00
C. Supplies $2,000.00
D. Travel $0.00
E. Equipment $28,983.00
F. Contractual $38,600.00
G. Other $20,000.00
Total Project Cost $197,967.00
Federal Request $197,967.00

Budget Narrative

A. Personnel

Overtime Initiatives

The RPD will use the funding for overtime initiatives throughout the year but especially during the Summer/Fall months in order to better ensure community public safety. The overtime initiatives range from 30 to 45 days. RPD officers will work in the overtime capacity and track and report all criminal activity. Although each sector will benefit from the crime suppression teams, special emphasis has been given to public housing communities, neighborhoods adjacent to public housing communities (single-family households) and area parks. The public housing communities have seen a major increase in violent crime. For example, May 19, 2013 to June 16, 2013, the Gilpin Court Community experienced 1 homicide, 3 robberies (2 involving firearms), and 5 aggravated assaults (3 involving firearms). During the same time frame in 2012, there were no homicides, 1 robbery, and 3 aggravated assaults. In total, when comparing the same 30 day period in 2012 to 2013, the Gilpin Court Community experienced a 125% increase in violent crime. To address this type of crime, bicycle patrol has proved to be effective. Communities have requested more bike patrol and it provides visibility to the area, but also allows better patrols in alleys and tight areas. The concept is to saturate an area that experiences these spikes in crime with 4-6 bicycle officers patrolling an area a few times a week for a 4 hour time frame. The purpose would be to prevent further crimes, but also be present in the event of an active crime.

It is expected that crime will be reduced by 5% to 10% in the targeted areas. A reduction of 10% of calls for service in the targeted areas by comparison to the prior year for the same time period is expected.

Richmond Police Department Fugitive and Firearm Initiative (FFI)

This initiative is a joint firearm partnership between sworn Richmond Police Department Officers and Virginia State Police staff supported by the A.T.F. The initiative targets those individuals that choose to use a firearm in an illegal manner. The FFI is operation for 100 days from Memorial Day thru Labor Day. FFI uses predictive analysis to determine target locations that had a high propensity for random gunfire and violent crimes involving firearms during the spring months. Target locations are fluid based upon analysis, weather, and operational success in certain areas. In addition to geographic locations, analytical research and social analysis assist in determining individuals with a high potential for firearm violence. In addition to the FFI, the RPD proactively seeks to quell any rise in crime during the summer months by deploying officers at area parks that traditionally busy during that time. Past efforts to police the areas with bike and foot patrols have proved beneficial. Added overtime patrol and visibility tends to minimize criminal activity.

It is expected that a 3% reduction in crime will be realized.

RPAL Flag Football League

Throughout the year, the Richmond Police Athletic League offers sporting activities for youth. The flag football league lasts eight weeks which includes games and practices. Richmond Police Officers are needed to work 4 hours for 8 weeks in addition to their normal shift. Officers enjoy interacting with the youth and act as coaches/mentors for over fifty kids.

B. Fringe Benefits

N/A

C. Supplies

Flag Football League

The Richmond Police Athletic League offers a Flag Football League for 80 kids. The majority of the kids resides in the inner city (Public Housing Communities) and is unable to purchase the uniform. Uniforms are extremely important to kids create a sense of teamwork and unity. The funding would be used for NFL Team Jerseys and belts.

D. Travel

N/A

E. Equipment

City Lacrosse Team

The City Lacrosse Team is comprised of youth that reside in the inner city. Lacrosse is considered a non-traditional sport compared to popular sports like basketball, football and baseball. The Richmond PAL Lacrosse League is a six-week program held in the winter. Last winter, the RPAL entered a team and were extremely successful. Lacrosse equipment includes a helmet, shoulder pads, gloves, arm guards, mouth piece and a lacrosse stick. 10 players are on the team. The funding would be used to outfit the entire team.

Desktop Computers

The Computer Services Unit (Records and Technology Division) will use JAG funds to purchase 34 new computers for the department. The equipment will assist with the completion of Computer Services inventory replacement plan. Additionally, the new equipment will eliminate further purchases associated with refurbished hardware. The older technology requires constant service and repair. The RPD is expected to have top rated equipment for processing various forms of data.

F. Consultants/Contractual

Richmond Adult Drug Treatment Court

The program staff attends a minimum of 20 hours of training each year by attending the following conferences: Virginia Drug Court Association (VDCA), and the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), and the Virginia Summer Institute for Addiction Studies. These conferences provide training and education on needed topics, e.g., screening and assessment, utilizing ancillary services, cultural proficiency, funding issues, and continued education needed to adapt to the new trends in treatment. The cost associated with attending these conferences includes membership, registration, hotel accommodations, and per diem for meals. Below is full breakdown of the associated costs:

  • NADCP Total =$14,350// 7 attendees
  • Registration= $600 x 7 (attendees) = $4,200
  • Airfare= $400 x 7 = 2,800
  • Hotel= $210 x 4 nights x 7=$5,880
  • Per Diem=$210 x 7=$1,470

 

  • VDCA Total=$2,657// 3 attendees
  • Registration=$180 x 3 (attendees) =$540
  • Mileage = 187 miles x 0.565= $106 x 3 (personal vehicles) =$317
  • Hotel = $150 x 3 nights = $450 x 3= $1,350
  • Per Diem=$150 x3=$450

 

  • Summer Institute for Addiction Studies Total=$2,993// 3 attendees
  • Registration=$335 x 3 (attendees) = $1,005
  • Mileage= 120 miles x .565=$67.80 x 3=$203
  • Hotel=$140 x 3 nights = $420 x 3= $1,260
  • Per Diem=$175 x 3= $525

Richmond Adult Drug Treatment Court (RADTC) Additionally, these systems are utilized for all criminal record requests for the magistrates' office, receiving faxed warrants from other jurisdictions and receiving teletype responses. All of these functions require a timely response and are conducted 24-hours a day, 365 days of the year. The loss of productivity combined with the need of timely responses for officer safety require the replacement of these three computers. is also in need of program supplies for group sessions: videotapes, workbooks, pens and paper, and printing. Additionally, incentives are used to reward participants who comply with the rules and regulations of the drug court program. Instead of continually being judged and punished, participants see their accomplishments bring praise and rewards. Some rewards are program based, such as advancement through the program phases resulting in more personal freedom with decreased probation visits, fewer therapy sessions, decreased drug testing, lifted curfews, and less court appearances. Rewards may be recognition based, e.g., a participant of the month award, or involve other rewards that are tangible - tokens or medallions, recreation activities, or gift vouchers. RADTC is requesting a total of $5,000.

Commonwealth Attorney’s Office

The Commonwealth Attorney’s Office will utilize the funding to train and educate a team of prosecutors, with an emphasis in the areas of Juvenile Justice, Guns, Gangs, Drug Prosecution, White Collar and Domestic Violent crimes. This training will support and enhance the quality of prosecution and expose our team to the best practices and innovative prosecution alternatives. It also aligns with the City’s mission to “achieve a sustained, long term turnaround in the quality of life…” All courses must meet the standards of the Virginia Bar and provide direct benefit to the City.

RPAL Flag Football League (Referees)

The cost associated with the flag football league includes field costs and the costs for referees. The league is held for 8 weeks. The funding would cover these associated costs.

G. Other

RPAL Lacrosse League Fee

Each child is required to pay a league fee to participate in the Lacrosse League Fee. Funding is needed to pay the league fee for 10 players.

RPAL Summer Camp Scholarships

The RPAL is currently in need of 10 summer camp scholarships for 10 kids to participate in RPAL’s annual summer camp. The summer camp is an eight week program designed to expose youth to a myriad of programs, projects and activities. 10 to 12 youth are paired with a RPD Police Officer. Registration for summer camp also includes a Kings Dominion Season Pass which can be used beyond the scheduled dates for the camp. The season pass is valued at $75.00.

Cellebrite Training

With JAG Funding, two officers will be able to attend valuable training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, GA. This training will provide not only an understanding of cell phone technologies but will include valuable equipment necessary beyond the week long training. The costs of the training includes tuition, room, meals and the following equipment:

  • Cellebrite Ufed Touch cell phone forensic program and unit (new unit valued at $10,000.00)
  • MacBook Pro laptop computer (valued at $1,400.00)
  • Lantern cell phone forensic program (valued at $600.00)
  • 32 GB thumb drive (valued at $50.00)
  • Streets and Trips (valued at $40.00)

The equipment provided by this class is valued at over $10,000.00 and is included in the cost of the course. This course will provide some of the necessary equipment needed for these investigations and will also cover the required training to utilize the equipment. This course is also the most cost effective way to gain the equipment and training needed to effectively investigate crimes involving cellular devices.

Contact Information:

Grants
Department of Budget
City of Richmond
900 Broad St., Room 1100
Richmond, VA
23219 USA
Map It
AskGrants
Phone: (804)646-7913
Fax: (804)646-7927

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